Nicuesa Lodge Leads the Way in Sustainable Tourism

Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge

Sustainable tourism hotel Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica.

For many travelers nowadays, finding lodging that follows sustainable tourism principles is a priority. But what does sustainable tourism really mean? Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge is one of the first sustainable tourism ecolodges in Costa Rica, a world leader in pioneering eco-tourism. Located in the spectacular southern Pacific Coast rainforest by the Osa Peninsula on the gulf of Golfo Dulce, Nicuesa Lodge is built on a 165-acre private rainforest reserve. Continue reading

Golfo Dulce is a top Costa Rica wildlife spot

Now is the time to see migrating humpback whales on whale watching tours at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Golfo Dulce – a top Costa Rica wildlife spot.  

Humpback whale in Golfo Dulce Costa Rica

Migrating humpback whales come to Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica between July and October.

You can see an abundance of Costa Rica wildlife at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge. The remote Osa Peninsula region is special because it holds 2.5% of the biodiversity of the entire planet in less than a thousandth of a percent of its total surface area. Now is the time to see Pacific humpback whales as they arrive in the southern gulf of Golfo Dulce, by the Osa Peninsula, on their annual migration from July to October. Continue reading

Earth Day 2017 Celebrated at Nicuesa Lodge

Following its commitment to protect the environment, eco-friendly Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica plans fun and inspiring Earth Day 2017 activities.

Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica

Get inspired on Earth Day 2017 at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica.

In honor of Earth Day this month, Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge is sowing the seeds for environmental awareness with guests and local communities with several fun activities.

On Earth Day 2017 – April 22 – Nicuesa Lodge is taking part in a reforestation campaign in the local town of Puerto Jimenez across the gulf of Golfo Dulce from the lodge on the Osa Peninsula. Lodge guests are invited to join in planting trees to help restore the environment from deforestation and the devastating effects of climate change. The Earth Day event is hosted by the National and Environmental Community Service Association, and will feature talks and other activities in addition to the tree planting. Continue reading

Swimmers race with dolphins and whales in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

In southern Costa Rica, Golfo Dulce’s extraordinary beauty and pristine habitat made it easy for swimmers in the 2016 Cruce Aguas Abiertas Golfo Dulce to be joined by dolphins and humpback whales as they swam across the gulf.

2016 Cruce Aguas Abiertas Golfo Dulce in Costa Rica

A Dolphin leaps in joy at the 2016 Golfo Dulce open water swimming race in Costa Rica

Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge once again hosted the launch of the 2016 Cruce Aguas Abiertas Golfo Dulce (Golfo Dulce Open Water Swimming) at the beginning of September.

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The mysterious world of hammerhead sharks in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

Golfo Dulce Costa Rica

Golfo Dulce in Costa Rica is a critical habitat for marine life on Earth. The “Sweet Gulf” in southern Costa Rica gets a lot of attention for being a refuge for migrating endangered Pacific humpback whales. Not only the birthplace for whales but also for dolphins and endangered hammerhead sharks, the 31-mile-long (50 km) Pacific gulf is essentially a big watery “cradle”.

The Costa Rican environmental organization Misión Tiburón (Shark Mission) is lobbying the Costa Rican government to protect Golfo Dulce as the first sanctuary for hammerhead sharks in the world.

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Nicuesa Lodge celebrates art & culture of Costa Rica

Cultural festival at Nicuesa Lodge in Costa Rica
The art and culture of Costa Rica were celebrated recently by guests, staff and visitors at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge. In honor of the national holiday, Annexation of Guanacaste Day on July 25, Nicuesa Lodge invited local artisans and a folkloric dance group to entertain hotel guests.

Cultural and art festivals are held at least twice a year at our Costa Rica eco-lodge to celebrate different events.

Boruca masks at Cultural festival at Nicuesa Lodge in Costa Rica
On this occasion, craft artisans and the Folkloric Dance Group Yuré from the town of Puerto Jimenez came across the Golfo Dulce by boat. Joining them was Ana Iris, a woman from the regional indigenous Boruca community, who brought traditional masks to show and sell. Made from lightweight balsa wood, the colorful, hand-carved masks beautifully depict Boruca legends and rainforest wildlife of the Osa Peninsula and Boruca indigenous lands.

Young dancers from the Dance Group Yuré performed various Costa Rican folkloric dances relating stories of coffee growers, fishermen, love, etc. “The dancers then invited our guests to dance the ‘Pavo’, or turkey dance. Everyone was very enthusiastic,” said Natalia Solis, Sustainability Coordinator at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge.

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Having a whale of a time at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica

It is nearly whale-watching season on the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica! Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge is readying to receive visitors to witness one of the most amazing spectacles in the animal kingdom – the thousands-of-miles-long migration of Pacific Humpback Whales.

Starting in August, the tranquil blue waters of the Golfo Dulce, between the Piedras Blancas National Park and the Osa Peninsula in southern Costa Rica, begin to receive the endangered whales that come annually to breed and give birth in Costa Rica’s warm waters.

The annual migration of Pacific Humpback Whales is a remarkable journey of nearly 10,000 miles from near the North and South Poles to warm tropical waters. As winter turns the seas to ice in Antarctica, southern Humpback Whales swim north to the Great Barrier Reef of Australia and as far as Costa Rica, where they can be seen between August and October. Northern Humpbacks travel from Alaska and British Columbia south to warmer waters by Mexico, Hawaii and Central America from December to March.

You can see Humpback Whales in Costa Rica along the southern Pacific Coast, from the Ballena National Marine Park just south of Dominical down through Cano Island Biological Reserve off of Drake Bay and into the Golfo Dulce.

 

Known as a tropical fjord, the “inner sea” of Golfo Dulce is a critical habitat for Humpback Whales and is vital to the species’ survival, according to the Center for Cetacean Research of Costa Rica (CEIC).

“A large part of the Gulf is used by Humpbacks to rest, give birth to their young and nurse them,” notes the CEIC. “The importance of protecting this area becomes more urgent if we take into consideration that Costa Rica’s economy depends on tourism …. Today, many tourists come to marvel at the solitude of these sanctuary waters; for them to see a dolphin or whale swimming near their boat is the best living evidence of the well-being of this still wild place.”

Once hunted to near-extinction, Humpback Whales are an endangered species with international government-protected status. Humpback whales are named for the prominent hump on their backs. The baleen whales can grow to be 56 feet long and weigh up to 40 tons, with distinctive, long black and white pectoral fins (flippers) that reach about one-third of their body length. They live a long life to about 45-50 years old. Babies (or “calves”) are born after an 11-12 month gestation period, which explains why some years when the whales are visiting tropical waters they are breeding and other years they are giving birth.

Humpback whales are easy to spot since they live at the ocean’s surface, both in the open ocean and in shallow coastline waters. They swim slowly and are known as the “acrobats of the sea” for their great displays of jumps and splashes (breaching). Males are famous for singing long, complex mating “songs” – sequences of squeaks, grunts, and other sounds – during their migration and when in breeding areas.

In the Golfo Dulce, the migrating whales are almost strictly from the Southern Hemisphere. Males concentrate at the entrance to the Gulf waiting to breed with available females, while pregnant females swim into the shallow waters of the Gulf’s interior to birth their young and breastfeed them.

Whale-watching in Golfo Dulce

See these gentle giants in person on the Golfo Dulce in Costa Rica. Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge is located in the pristine rainforest on a remote beach of the Golfo Dulce. During whale-watching season, the award-winning Costa Rica eco-lodge offers boat tours of the Gulf to see the whales, resident pods of dolphins, and other marine life like sea turtles and seabirds.

A TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence winner, the rainforest lodge in Costa Rica has its own 165-acre private preserve bordering the Piedras Blancas National Park. It is a unique adventure travel destination for its remote, pristine wilderness location.

Article by Shannon Farley

Humpback Whales come to Costa Rica’s Golfo Dulce

In southern Costa Rica, the tranquil blue waters of the Golfo Dulce stretch between the Piedras Blancas National Park and the Osa Peninsula. It is an area of pristine tropical wilderness and abundant wildlife. The Gulf’s calm jade green-blue surface makes it easy to see dolphins frolicking, sea turtles swimming, fish jumping out of the water, and marine birds diving for those fish. Starting in August, the Gulf gets even busier with visiting migrating Humpback Whales. Known as a tropical fjord, the “inner sea” of Golfo Dulce is a critical habitat for Humpback Whales and is vital to the species’ survival, according to the Center of Cetacean Investigation of Costa Rica (CEIC). Whales arrive annually to breed and give birth in the warm waters of Costa Rica’s South Pacific Coast, from the Ballena National Marine Park just south of Dominical down to the Golfo Dulce.


The annual migration of Pacific Humpback Whales is one of the most remarkable journeys by any creature on the planet. The marine mammals travel between 3,000 and 5,000 miles each way, from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, making them one of the farthest-migrating animals on Earth. Northern Hemisphere Humpbacks travel from Alaska and British Columbia to Mexico, Hawaii and Central America, for the months of December to March. Southern, Antarctic-based Humpback Whales spend their winter months near Australia and as far north as Costa Rica from June to November. They are most likely to be seen in Costa Rica between August and October.
The southern whales are more common to see in Golfo Dulce, according to research by the CEIC. Females swim into the shallow waters of the Gulf’s interior to birth their young and breastfeed them. Males concentrate in the outer area of the Gulf waiting to breed with available females. The CEIC and other environmental organizations, including Earthwatch, are working to create a Marine Protected Area within Golfo Dulce to safeguard the whales’ reproductive and feeding grounds, and to establish buffer areas surrounding these critical habitats. “(There is an) urgent need to create connectivity between different marine protected areas to maximize the effectiveness in the protection of species and resources,” note CEIC researchers.
Humpback whales are an endangered species with international government-protected status. They are easy to see since they live at the ocean’s surface. They swim slowly and are known as the “acrobats of the sea” for their aerial frolicking. Humpbacks also are known for their “songs” – long, varied, and complex sequences of squeaks, grunts and other sounds. Only males have been recorded singing and they seem to produce the complex songs only in warm waters – thought by scientists, therefore, to be mating calls. Golfo Dulce also is home to important resident and migratory communities of Bottlenose Dolphins, Spotted Dolphins, Spinner Dolphins, and the occasionally seen False Killer Whales. Visit Golfo Dulce.
Stay on Golfo Dulce at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge, and see Humpback Whales and dolphins in person. The award-winning eco-lodge offers whale-watching boat tours of the Gulf to see marine life such as dolphins, sea turtles and whales. Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge is located on a 165-acre private preserve bordering the Piedras Blancas National Park. A TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence winner, the sustainable lodge is a unique adventure travel destination for its remote, pristine wilderness location.